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Dr. Gaila Mackenzie-Strawn

MS, DC, CTN

Leaky Gut and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

On : 20 December, 2012

In : Fatigue , Leaky Gut

2 Comments

Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2008 Dec;29(6):902-10.

Normalization of leaky gut in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is accompanied by a clinical improvement: effects of age, duration of illness and the translocation of LPS from gram-negative bacteria.

Maes M, Leunis JC.
Source
MCare4U Outpatient Clinics, Belgium.

Abstract
BACKGROUND:

There is now evidence that an increased translocation of LPS from gram negative bacteria with subsequent gut-derived inflammation, i.e. induction of systemic inflammation and oxidative & nitrosative stress (IO&NS), is a new pathway in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

METHODS:

The present study examines the serum concentrations of IgA and IgM to LPS of gram-negative enterobacteria, i.e. Hafnia Alvei; Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Morganella Morganii, Pseudomonas Putida, Citrobacter Koseri, and Klebsielle Pneumoniae in CFS patients both before and after intake of natural anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative substances (NAIOSs), such as glutamine, N-acetyl cysteine and zinc, in conjunction with a leaky gut diet during 10-14 months. We measured the above immune variables as well as the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Rating Scale in 41 patients with CFS before and 10-14 months after intake of NAIOSs.

RESULTS:

Subchronic intake of those NAIOSs significantly attenuates the initially increased IgA and IgM responses to LPS of gram negative bacteria. Up to 24 patients showed a significant clinical improvement or remission 10-14 months after intake of NAIOSs. A good clinical response is significantly predicted by attenuated IgA and IgM responses to LPS, the younger age of the patients, and a shorter duration of illness (< 5 years). DISCUSSION:

The results show that normalization of the IgA and IgM responses to translocated LPS may predict clinical outcome in CFS. The results support the view that a weakened tight junction barrier with subsequent gut-derived inflammation is a novel pathway in CFS and that it is a new target for drug development in CFS. Meanwhile, CFS patients with leaky gut can be treated with specific NAIOSs and a leaky gut diet.

PMID:
s

19112401

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Naturopath & Holistic Doctor San Diego Dr. Gaila Mackenzie-Strawn MS,DC, CTN In 1979, I made a life changing decision. Having suffering with painful abdominal pain since the age of two,Read more

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